Location and traceability in times of pandemic

Yesterday (March 11th, 2020), the World Health Organisation’s Director General characterised COVID-19 as a pandemic. Today, in Montréal where reelyActive is based, and around the world, many find themselves directly and personally affected by measures intended to prevent the spread of the virus, including business, institution and school closures, as well as travel restrictions and self-quarantine.

In our team’s adjustment to these changes, we are prompted to recall use cases of our technology particularly applicable to the situation in which we, and countless others, find themselves, and which we’ll present in this blog post.

Working remotely but not alone

In 2014, our clients who were developing The Thing System, worked remotely from California and the UK, and devised a clever use of their technology and ours: whenever a team member was present in their home office (as detected by our tech), a light would turn on in their colleague’s home office halfway around the world (enabled by their tech). In this way, each team member was aware, through calm technology, when their colleague was “at work”, so that they could confidently initiate communication at an appropriate moment, whenever required.

Beaming in

In 2016, our clients Event Presence reached out to make their Beam mobile telepresence experience location-aware. Can’t physically attend an event or conference? They offered a means to attend remotely with the ability to move around and interact freely. As “beaming in” to an unfamiliar space can be disorienting, we worked with them to provide real-time location and context to their remote attendees. Working with the Beams, we found them incredibly useful not only for remotely attending events, but also for working remotely on the very deployments we were developing. On many occasions we even found ourselves chatting Beam-to-Beam in the venue, surely to the bewilderment of passers-by, but very much to the benefit of what we were working to achieve!

Tracing person-to-person and person-to-asset interactions

In 2019, our clients at USC deployed the first trials of DirAct, a technology we co-developed, to automatically capture person-to-person and person-to-asset interactions in an active hospital setting. Hospital staff opt-in to wear a Bluetooth Low Energy badge which detects other badges or asset tags in proximity, and which relays this information via our gateway infrastructure temporarily deployed throughout the hospital. Our colleagues at USC collect this information as part of a study to determine workplace stress factors, however it is not difficult to imagine how this same deployment could be used for traceability of interactions between staff and patients, as well as with hand-washing stations, in the context of a contagious disease such as COVID-19.

The measures currently undertaken to curb the spread of COVID-19 remind us of the pertinence of our physical location—and that of others—in our daily lives, especially as these become impeded or restricted.

In these times, it is not difficult to envisage the wide-reaching potential of real-time location technology, as evidenced by the above examples to which we’ve proudly contributed. From wherever you find yourself reading this we trust that you will stay healthy as much as innovative!

Hears Presence

We are becoming cyborgs. We carry smartphones and we wear wearables to enhance our human abilities. It’s not difficult to argue that these have become extensions of ourselves figuratively, if not yet literally. Nor is it difficult to argue that today we still adapt ourselves to interact through our technology rather than the other way around.

What if we could adapt the interactions of our technology to a medium we ourselves naturally sense?

Présences Périphériques, an art installation by Evelyne Drouin (DJ Mini) and reelyActive co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Dungen, exhibited at Centre Clark through February 17th, 2018, does just that. Put on a set of headphones and relax to the sounds of our smartphones and wearables advertising their presence to one another and to their surroundings. Observe the installation “breathing” faster as this chatter increases, and brighter — the speakers are retrofitted with Philips Hue lightbulbs — as you approach with your smartphone or wearable.

Hear the Artist Talk, not as human voices, but rather as those of the devices present:

Hear the artists and their devices simultaneously, and observe the installation “breathing”:

Listen. We are becoming cyborgs. Today we humans can announce our machine-presence with a $5 retrofit, and make our entire machine-story available to anyone, anyplace or anything nearby who chooses to listen.

Who chooses to listen hears the future.

Hearable Nearables

Imagine you could “hear” Bluetooth devices moving through a building. In anticipation of last weekend’s #HackTheHouse hackathon for smart buildings, hosted at Notman House where we’ve had our technology deployed since 2012, we created the Notman Tonal Presence web application to do just that.

On each of Notman’s three floors, there are three of our Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) sensors (which we call reelceivers), plus an addition sensor in the adjacent OSMO Cafe.

Think of each floor as a musical note in a scale (C – E – G – C), and each wing of that floor as a pan in stereo (Left – Centre – Right).

When BLE devices “appear” and “disappear” they produce a note which encodes the location by the tonality and pan. Same thing when BLE devices “displace” from one zone to another, only these use a ping-pong delay rather than a pan.

For the hackathon, we ordered three packs of Estimote Nearables which are BLE devices that periodically transmit their temperature and 3-axis acceleration. Unfortunately, these were held up in customs and didn’t make it in time. But the web app essentially turns these into “hearable nearables” and, as you’ll pick out in the video, we could tell not only when they had arrived, but also where in the house they were:

Yes, they’re on the second floor east (right) wing. Why so noisy? As we discussed in our ObservaBLE Etiquette blog post, the Estimote Nearables cycle their identifier with every transmission. To an observer, that would be interpreted as a new device “appearing” each time. Hence plenty of appearance and disappearance notes in the web application.

To reinforce this point, have a look at the Google Analytics (GA) timeline for Notman House. Our platform pushes all the events from the house to GA (see our Google Analytics for the Physical World blog post), where each is interpreted as a session based on its identifier. The Nearables’ aggressive identifier-cycling results significantly biases the number of sessions, and hence we can tell from the edge of the high plateau when they arrived: shortly after 16h on November 15th.

We created the Notman Tonal Presence application as an example of calm technology for smart buildings. The ambient sounds allow the listener to subconsciously register foot traffic within the building while leaving their attention free for other tasks. Even the casual listener would have been gently alerted to the arrival of the Nearables, which is precisely the objective of calm technology. And, now, duly alerted, we can direct our attention towards filtering out the Nearables from GA so that their incessant identifier-cycling doesn’t saturate the session counts!